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5 ‘Gotta-Dos’ In April for a Worry-Free Summer

by The Schnoor Team

 

Battle bugs before they bite (or sting!) you — and check the attic for problems.

Tackling five simple tasks now gives you a head start on spring.

That leaves you plenty of worry-free time to enjoy the warmer weather.

#1 Tell Insects to Bug Off

Early spring warmth awakens insects, so start to protect your home now. Seal openings in eaves, decks, and other structures to keep out carpenter bees.

Nix mosquitoes by eliminating standing water or treating it with larvicide. Call a pro to destroy wasp and yellow jacket nests, unless you’re experienced enough to engage in a bee battle.

#2 Prep Tools for Lawn Care

Ladies and gentlemen, start your mowers. April’s the month to get this vital piece of equipment ready to roll. An unmaintained machine can cost money, slow you down, and leave your lawn vulnerable to disease. So, before you pull the starter rope:

Replace spark plugs and the air filter.

Change the oil and sharpen blades.

Fill the tank with fresh gasoline.

While you’ve got your gloves on, clean, sharpen, and repair your garden tools. When your azaleas are ready to prune, you’re not going to want to keep them waiting.

#3 Tune Up the Air Conditioner

With flip-flop weather comes another summer tradition: cranking up the air conditioning. Tune your AC in April, before the mercury and service rates rise.

Ask your HVAC company if they have a twice-a-year maintenance plan. Often, you can get discounted rates if you join, and you don’t have to worry about finding someone to do it each spring and fall.

Now you only have to worry about which pair of Havaianas to wear.

#4 Check the Attic (and Garage)

How long has it been since you looked in the attic? Yeah, us too.

April’s the time to inspect this oft-ignored space — before it gets too hot. Look for signs of animal activity (raccoons love attics), and repair or replace damaged insulation or wiring.

Ensure stored items are still secure; tighten container lids and dust covers and replace moth repellants.

While we’re talking storage, how’s the garage? If soccer balls, bikes, and luggage have taken prime parking space, regain control with a storage system. Your car (and your partner) will thank you.

#5 Clean Up Bird Feeders

Besides spreading diseases to birds, dirty bird feeders attract rodents and hurt curb appeal. Gross.

Give your bird feeders a deep clean — not just a rinse-out.

Empty them, take them apart, and wash with a solution of one part bleach to nine parts hot water. Rinse well to remove all traces of bleach, air dry, and refill with seed.

Clean under feeders, too, because moldy or spoiled seed on the ground can make pets sick. Don’t forget the bird bath.

A pretty yard that’s a healthy haven for birds makes a good impression — one that says “this is a well-cared-for home.”


Source: http://pexels.com/search/home organization/

KELLEY WALTERS

is a Southern writer and editor. She focuses on interior design and home improvement at outlets from HGTV to Paintzen. She lives in Italy a month every year, drinking Negronis and writing in internet cafes.

5 Awesomely Easy Landscaping Projects

by The Schnoor Team

 

It’s your yard — yours to do with as you wish. And while that’s great, that doesn’t mean you have to be one of those people who spends every spare moment in their yard, sprucing it up.

But, still, your landscaping could use a little something. But something easy.

Here are five totally doable projects that your budget will barely notice, but your neighbors definitely will:

#1 Add Some (Tough) Edging

Tell your grass who’s boss with edging that can stand up to even the crabbiest of all crabgrasses.

But don’t make the mistake that many homeowners make of buying the flexible plastic stuff, thinking it will be easier to install. It’ll look cheap and amateurish from day one.

Worse, it won’t last. And before you know it, you won’t be able to tell where your garden bed ends and your “lawn” begins.

Instead buy the more rigid, tough stuff in either fiberglass, aluminum, or steel.

Tips on installing edging:

Lay out a hose in the pattern you want.

Sprinkle flour or powdered chalk to mark the hose pattern.

Use a lawn edger (or spade) to make an incision for the edging.

Tap the edging into the incision with a rubber mallet.

The cost? Mostly your time, and up to $2.50 a square foot for the edging.

#2 Create a Focal Point with a Berm

Berm built in front yardImage: Jon Jenks-Bauer

A berm is a mound of gently sloping earth, often created to help with drainage. You can also build them to create “island beds,” a focal point of textures and colors that are so much more interesting than plain ol’ green grass.

Plus, they’ll give you privacy — and diffuse street noises. What’s not to like about that? Especially if you live in more urban areas.

For most yards, berms should max out at 2-feet high because of the space needed to properly build one.

They need a ratio of 4-6 feet of width for every foot of height. That’s at least 8 feet for a typical 2-foot high berm. So be sure you have the room, or decrease the height of your berm.

Popular berm plantings include:

Flowering bushes, such as azaleas

Evergreens, such as blue spruce

Perennials such as periwinkle

Tall, swaying prairie grasses

Lots of mulch to keep weeds away

The cost?  Usually less than $300, depending on how big you make it, how much soil you need to buy to get to your desired height, and what plants you choose.


#3 Make a Flagstone Wall

Aim to build a wall no more than 12 inches tall, and it becomes a super simple DIY project — no mortar needed at all!   

How to build an easy flagstone wall:

Dig a trench a couple of inches deep and wide enough to accommodate the flagstones.

Fill with pea gravel and/or sand and tamp to make level.

Lay out the flagstones to see their shapes and sizes.

Stack the smaller stones first.

Save the largest, prettiest flagstones for the top layer.

Backfill with gravel.

Choose a stone of consistent thickness. Flagstone might be limestone, sandstone, shale — any rock that splits into slabs.

The cost? About $300 for stones and sand (a ton of 2-inch-thick stone is enough for a wall 10 feet long and 12 inches high).

 #4 Install a Path with Flagstone or Gravel

There’s something romantic, charming, and simply welcoming about a meandering pathway to your front door or back garden — which means it has super-huge impact when it comes to your home’s curb appeal.

You can use flagstone, pea gravel, decomposed or crushed granite, even poured concrete (although that’s not easy to DIY).

A few tips for building a pathway:

Allow 3 feet of width for clearance.

Create curves rather than straight lines for a pleasing effect.

Remove sod at least 3 to 4 inches deep to keep grass from coming back.

If you live in an area with heavy rains, opt for large, heavy stones.

The cost? Anywhere from a couple of hundred bucks to upwards of $500 depending on the material you use, with decomposed granite being the least expensive, and flagstone (also the easiest of the bunch to install) the costliest.

#5 Build a Tree Surround

Stone tree surroundImage: Clean Green Landscape

Installing a masonry surround for a tree is a two-fer project: It looks great, and it means you’ve got less to mow. Come to think of it, it’s a three-fer. It can work as extra seating when you have your lawn party, too!

All it takes is digging a circular trench, adding some sand, and installing brick, cement blocks, or stone. Just go for whatever look you like best.

The trickiest part is getting an even circle around the tree. Here’s how:

Tie a rope around the tree, making a loop big enough so that when you pull it taut against the tree, the outer edge of the loop is right where you want the surround to be.

Set your spade inside the loop with the handle plumb — straight up and down. Now, as you move around the tree, the loop of rope keeps the spade exactly the same distance from the base of the tree, creating a nice circle.

Then build the tree surround:

Dig out a circular trench about 8 inches deep and 6 inches wide.

Add a layer of sand.

Set bricks at an angle for a saw-tooth effect or lay them end-to-end.

Fill the surround with 2 to 3 inches of mulch.

The cost? Super cheap. You can do it for less than $25 with commonly-available pavers and stones.

Source: https://www.houselogic.com/by-room/yard-patio/easy-landscaping-projects/?site_ref=mosaic

 

Understanding Real Estate Representation

by The Schnoor Team

Whether you’re buying or selling, it’s important to choose representation that meets your needs in the transaction.

You have choices when selecting representation in a real estate transaction. Here are five tips for understanding which type of legal relationship with a real estate professional, called an agency relationship, will best protect you when you buy or sell a home.

1. Buyer’s Agency

When you’re buying a home, you can hire an agent who represents only you, called an exclusive buyer’s representative or agent. A buyer’s agent works in your best interest and owes you a fiduciary duty. You can pay your buyer’s agent yourself, or ask the seller, or the seller’s agent, to pay your agent a share of their sales commission.

If you’re selling your home and hiring an agent to list it exclusively, you’ve hired a selling representative—an agent who owes fiduciary duties to you. Typically, you pay a selling agent a commission at closing. Selling agents usually offer or agree to pay a portion of their sales commission to the buyer’s agent. If your seller’s agent brings in a buyer, your agent keeps the entire commission.

2. Subagency

When you purchase a home, the agent you can opt to work with may not be your agent at all, but instead may be a subagent of the seller. In general, a subagent represents and acts in the best interest of the sellers and sellers’ agent.

If your agent is acting as a subagent, you can expect to be treated honestly, but the subagent owes loyalty to the sellers and their agent and can’t put your interests above those of the sellers. In a few states, agents aren’t permitted to act as subagents.

Never tell a subagent anything you don’t want the sellers to know. Maybe you offered $150,000 for a home but are willing to go up to $160,000. That’s the type of information subagents would be required to pass on to their clients, the sellers.

3. Disclosed Dual Agency

In many states, agents and companies can represent both parties in a home sale as long as that relationship is fully disclosed. It’s called disclosed dual agency. Because dual agents represent both parties, they can’t be protective of and loyal to only you. Dual agents don’t owe all the traditional fiduciary duties to clients. Instead, they owe limited fiduciary duties to each party.

Why would you agree to dual agency? Suppose you want to buy a house that’s listed for sale by the same real estate brokerage where your buyer’s agent works. In that case, the real estate brokerage would be representing both you and the seller and you’d both have to agree to that.

Because there’s a potential for conflicts of interest with dual agency, all parties must give their informed consent. In many states, that consent must be in writing.

4. Designated Agency

A form of disclosed dual agency, “designated agency” allows two different agents within a single firm to represent the buyer and seller in the same transaction. To avoid conflicts that can arise with dual agency, some managing brokers designate or appoint agents in their company to represent only sellers, or only buyers. But that isn’t required for designated agency. A designated, or appointed, agent will give you full representation and represent your best interests.

5. Nonagency Relationship

In some states, you can choose not to be represented by an agent. That’s referred to as nonagency or working with a transaction broker or facilitator. In general, in nonagency representation, the real estate professional you work with owes you fewer duties than a traditional agency relationship. And those duties vary from state to state. Ask the person you’re working with to explain what he or she will and won’t do for you.

Source: https://www.pexels.com/photo/adult-blur-boss-business-288477/

G. M. FILISKO

is an attorney and award-winning writer. A frequent contributor to publications including Bankrate, REALTOR Magazine, and the American Bar Association Journal, she specializes in real estate, personal finance, and legal topics.

5 ‘Gotta-Dos’ In April for a Worry-Free Summer

by The Schnoor Team

Battle bugs before they bite (or sting!) you — and check the attic for problems.

#1 Tell Insects to Bug Off

Early spring warmth awakens insects, so start to protect your home now. Seal openings in eaves, decks, and other structures to keep out carpenter bees.

Nix mosquitoes by eliminating standing water or treating it with larvicide. Call a pro to destroy wasp and yellow jacket nests, unless you’re experienced enough to engage in a bee battle.

#2 Prep Tools for Lawn Care

Ladies and gentlemen, start your mowers. April’s the month to get this vital piece of equipment ready to roll. An unmaintained machine can cost money, slow you down, and leave your lawn vulnerable to disease. So, before you pull the starter rope: 

 

Replace spark plugs and the air filter.

Change the oil and sharpen blades.

Fill the tank with fresh gasoline.

While you’ve got your gloves on, clean, sharpen, and repair your garden tools. When your azaleas are ready to prune, you’re not going to want to keep them waiting.

#3 Tune Up the Air Conditioner
   
With flip-flop weather comes another summer tradition: cranking up the air conditioning. Tune your AC in April, before the mercury and service rates rise.

Ask your HVAC company if they have a twice-a-year maintenance plan. Often, you can get discounted rates if you join, and you don’t have to worry about finding someone to do it each spring and fall.

Now you only have to worry about which pair of Havaianas to wear.

#4 Check the Attic (and Garage)

How long has it been since you looked in the attic? Yeah, us too.

April’s the time to inspect this oft-ignored space — before it gets too hot. Look for signs of animal activity (raccoons love attics), and repair or replace damaged insulation or wiring.

Ensure stored items are still secure; tighten container lids and dust covers and replace moth repellants.

While we’re talking storage, how’s the garage? If soccer balls, bikes, and luggage have taken prime parking space, regain control with a storage system. Your car (and your partner) will thank you.

#5 Clean Up Bird Feeders
   
Besides spreading diseases to birds, dirty bird feeders attract rodents and hurt curb appeal. Gross.

Give your bird feeders a deep clean — not just a rinse-out.

Empty them, take them apart, and wash with a solution of one part bleach to nine parts hot water. Rinse well to remove all traces of bleach, air dry, and refill with seed.

Clean under feeders, too, because moldy or spoiled seed on the ground can make pets sick. Don’t forget the bird bath.

A pretty yard that’s a healthy haven for birds makes a good impression — one that says “this is a well-cared-for home.”

Source: https://www.houselogic.com/organize-maintain/home-maintenance-tips/when-to-spray-for-bugs/

KELLEY WALTERS
is a Southern writer and editor. She focuses on interior design and home improvement at outlets from HGTV to Paintzen. She lives in Italy a month every year, drinking Negronis and writing in internet cafes. 

The Santa Fe Margarita Trail

by The Schnoor Team

Santa Fe has always been a mecca for those who love margaritas—the beloved beverage both our residents and visitors like to savor. It is most unusual to find a restaurant or bar in Santa Fe that does not feature a margarita on its cocktail list. So it's only fitting that Santa Fe has come to create The Santa Fe Margarita Trail.


Trail adventurers now have the opportunity to discover Santa Fe's unique culture and culinary creativity by enjoying specialty-crafted margaritas made famous by the most beloved restaurants and bars in The City Different. There’s 31 amazing margaritas on the Trail to tantalize your taste buds so you’re sure to find a favorite or two. All margaritas featured on the Margarita Trail are made with 100% agave tequila. The Santa Fe Margarita Trail promises to be one of your most memorable Santa Fe adventures. 

 

See more details at: https://santafe.org

30 Verano Loop, Santa Fe, NM - The Schnoor Team

by The Schnoor Team

30 Verano Loop, Santa Fe, NM

See full details here: goo.gl/9mmHHe

Beautiful remodel! Entire interior updated while the exposed beams keep the original charm. Stunning kitchen boasts new cabinets with self closing doors, beautiful hardware, new stainless steel appliances, fixtures, gas range with stainless steel exhaust. New bamboo flooring throughout. All new bathrooms with custom tile, cabinets and fixtures. New windows, stucco and a new tank-less boiler/water heater. All on 1.46 acres with an awesome view of the mountains from the huge covered patio in back. A large 2 car garage too! A must see!

7 Things You Thought You Knew About Foreclosures

by The Schnoor Team

 

The foreclosure market in Albuquerque has been relatively dormant until recent years and this has caused many people to be skeptical of it. They don't fully understand how foreclosures work, and this lack of understanding can foster foreclosure myths that are dangerous both for homeowners who want to avoid foreclosure and buyers interested in purchasing a foreclosure.

Here are seven of the most common myths about foreclosures:

Foreclosures only happen in poor areas.

Foreclosures come in all shapes and sizes and occur in all neighborhoods. From low-income to million-dollar properties, you will see the full spectrum of homes entering into the foreclosure process. Economic forces such as rising interest rates and decreasing home values affect homeowners from all types of neighborhoods.

Financial irresponsibility causes most foreclosures.

While there are always those cases of financial neglect, most homeowners have shown some high level of financial responsibility in order to qualify to purchase a property in the first place. Unforeseen events such as job loss or a catastrophic accident can cause sudden and unpredictable financial havoc for homeowners. In addition, foreclosures also tend to increase when interest rates are up and property values begin to decrease. When this occurs, homeowners may find themselves paying higher monthly mortgage payments for a property that is no longer worth what they originally bought it for.

All foreclosures are in disrepair.

While some foreclosures can be in less than ideal shape, many are in great condition. The myth that all foreclosures are in disrepair seems to be driven by the other myth that foreclosures are usually caused by financial irresponsibility. Many homeowners who find themselves in a default situation encounter circumstances that are out of their control. Even so, this usually does not negatively affect the condition of the property. However, if you are not an expert in buying foreclosure properties, it is highly recommended that you seek the advice of a professional who is experienced with these types of sales to avoid common pitfalls.

Lenders want to foreclose on homeowners.

The foreclosure process is costly and time consuming, and is a last resort for lenders to recover their investment. When a homeowner defaults on a mortgage agreement, the lender must first file a public default notice after which the homeowner is given a grace period known as a pre-foreclosure period. During this time, the homeowner can pay off the debt or choose to sell the property. The minimum timeframe for a pre-foreclosure period varies by state and can range from 27 days (Texas) to 290 days (Wisconsin). Only at the end of the pre-foreclosure period can the lender auction the property off to a third-party buyer or repossess the property and sell it on the regular market.

Foreclosures are often bought for pennies on the dollar.

While it is true that foreclosures are often purchased below market value, one should be leery of anyone claiming that one can consistently find discounts of less than 10 percent of market value. 

Foreclosure buyers usually take advantage of the homeowner.

While homeowners in default should be wary of unscrupulous buyers and investors who try to take unfair advantage of the situation, most foreclosure buyers can actually help an owner to walk away with something to show for equity in the property and avoid a bad mark on his or her credit history. During the pre-foreclosure period, a potential buyer may approach the homeowner in default and arrange to buy the property before the foreclosure actually takes place. This pre-foreclosure sale also benefits buyers, allowing them to often purchase properties below full market price.

Foreclosure buying is only for professional investors.

Perhaps at one time this may have been the case, but with all of the tools available to today's buyers, more people than ever before have the opportunity to purchase foreclosure properties. Using online resources such as RealtyTrac's online foreclosure database, potential buyers can search nationwide for properties in pre-foreclosure, up for auction or banked-owned, as well as find extensive reports on each property listed. Buyers can also get financing and find real estate agents familiar with ins and outs of the foreclosure market to help create a smoother transaction.

Need more information?

If you have more questions about buying foreclosures, avoiding foreclosure, or any real estate topic, you can contact using the information below! 


8 Steps to Decluttering your Entire Home!

by The Schnoor Team

It starts as a small pile of mail, or a few clothes, or some toys, and a few days later the piles have multiplied in size. By the end of the week the pile has become a monster that you really don’t want to deal with. As I have stressed countless times, a clean house will sell faster and for more but a clean house also just feels better and will improve your mood! So I present to you an 8 step plan to attack and declutter each room to get your house under control!

TIP: Don't start with family heirlooms, those are the hardest to get rid of.

Step 1: Start Off Right

You will want to start in the place that really motivated you to begin cleaning in the first place. What was the straw the broke the camel’s back? A backlog of un-opened mail or laundry? The goal is to take care of that one AREA and not the whole room.

Step 2: The Bathroom

The bathroom is fairly easy to declutter. It is fast and easy to throw away empty or unused bottles, expired items, and old makeup. It’s important to remember that, depending on the size, your bathroom should not be treated as a linen closet. Don’t go overboard putting all your extras in your bathroom, use your linen closet.

Step 3: Public Rooms

 

Perhaps you’re embarrassed by all the DVDs, video games and newspapers scattered around your living room, or can’t host another dinner party until something is done about all that stuff on the dining room table. Areas that guests see are often a lot easier to go through and sort out.

Bonus: Cleaning them up will allow you to quickly benefit socially.

 

Step 4: The Kitchen

Most people view the kitchen as one of the biggest challenges. The entire area is filled with things that you use or could use: extra containers, boxes, twist ties, and extra kitchen tools. The best approach is to think of the last time you used each item. The items you haven’t used in a couple of months get put in boxes and store them away in the garage or attic. Anything that you haven’t used in a year or more gets stored in longer-term storage or gets donated.

Step 5: Clothing/Closets

Give yourself plenty of time for closets, around an hour and a half. I recommend starting in the corners and moving toward the middle. Items in this area are very personal and you will certainly have a hard time getting rid of clothes. Try to be objective, which clothes have you never worn? If you find yourself getting too bogged down put things in an “undecided box” put it away. If, in a year, you haven’t noticed they are missing: donate them.

Step 6: The Bedrooms

Bedrooms are made up entirely of personal mementos, photos, family heirlooms, and other items with lots of emotional attachment. The best idea is to get a close friend to sit with you and help you make QUICK decisions. Remember, your bedroom is primarily for relaxing and sleeping; all items that won’t help you do that doesn’t really need to be there. Step 9: Attic/Basement/Garage Never do these rooms solo—furniture and big boxes will slow you down, so schedule a helper. As with closets, work back-to-front, beginning in the back corners and moving toward the middle of the room. Back corners tend to fill with junk you don’t need, and make for quick tossing that opens up a lot of space.

Step 7: Home Office

Clear out your entire desk; empty drawers and clear off all surface spaces. Set paperwork aside to sort through later. Designate one desk drawer to office supplies. Sort through your desk files and papers and as you organize the paperwork, keep these guidelines in mind: If you don’t use the file on a weekly basis, or if it’s not personal or confidential, either dispose of it or store it in a separate filing cabinet.

Step 8: The Party

If you have reached this step you deserve a reward! Plan a party. A giveaway party, that is. Invite over friends who might be happy to take that necklace or the jeans you never wear off your hands. This party will kill two birds with one stone. You get rewarded for decluttering your entire home AND you will be further decluttering by getting rid of unneeded items!

Are You Looking to Sell Your Home? Let us help! Our Real Estate experience and resources will be at your disposal! Contact us today, visit our Seller Resources Page, or fill out the form below!

foxyform

 

 

5 Crucial Things that Determine Your Sales Price

by The Schnoor Team

Every time I have an initial consultation with a potential listing client, I discuss the listing price for their home. As a part of that process, the seller and I discuss the price they think their home should sell for.

I think it is worth noting that the seller's desired sales price may or may not be a realistic estimate of the Price that the home will sell for in the current Real Estate Market. Pricing is the most important factor in selling a home. It is the qualified, professional, REALTOR who can balance these factors. 

Here are some of the most relevant factors that determine your sales price.

Comparable Sales of Other Homes

Again, sales price is different than listing price, so keep in mind that the price you saw on your neighbor's flier probably isn't the price it actually sold for. You should contact your Realtor to get a list of the homes that have sold in the past 3-4 months. When looking at these sales, keep in mind that you probably aren't comparing apples to apples, but it will give you a starting point.

Home Improvements

I'll caution you on this one. I have had clients think that just because they added tile or a covered patio that their price has gone up some extreme amount. That may or may not be the case. Remember that home improvement trends are trends, and they come and go. Just because you like tile doesn't mean that everyone does. Home improvements can actually depreciate the sales price of your home.

Competing Home Prices

Watch the competition like a hawk! How long have comparable homes been on the market? What prices are selling fast and what prices are selling slowly? Compare the price per square foot. You are competing for buyers so you need to think through your competition's prices before making a final decision.

The Market

Buyers set the market value. If you have a home in high demand, your home is worth more money. That's pretty simple. In a seller's market you can price your home above market value and still attract buyers. In a buyer's market you need to price it just below market value.

The Location

Is your home located across the street from Walmart with parking lot lights glaring into your bedroom windows? If so, it might be worth less than a home of equal size in a different location. .

These are just 5 factors that determine your sales price. The truth is that there are many more. If you're thinking about selling your home, The Schnoor Team will help you find your home's approximate current market home value. This CMA (Current Market Home Value) is absolutely free, there is no obligation, it is completely confidential, and the whole process can be carried out by e-mail. Follow this link for the FREE CMA. 

 

Make Sure Your Home Stands Tall in a Competitive Market

by The Schnoor Team

Home sellers today must convince a new era of buyers returning to the market that their homes stand for value and quality. 

The time-honored open house event remains a terrific way to expose your property to many consumers and gain distinction from the competition. While your real estate professional will advertise and manage the event, it is up to you to ensure that your home is seen in the best light possible. Remember, you only have one chance to make a first impression, so approach your open house event as your property’s showcase. Here are several ways to make your property shine, inside and out. 

Start with the outside. Do a visual check of the front of the house from across the street. Does your property have curb appeal? It should look inviting, with a trimmed lawn and flowerbed and a freshly painted front door. Polish door handles and knockers and replace worn items such as a rusty doorbell. Consider adding a new doormat and flowering plants at the entrance. Don’t forget to wash your windows and clean any oil or rust spots from the driveway.

Be sure to inspect the side and back yards. Add some flowering plants to the back as well. Clean and rearrange the outdoor furniture to look inviting. Put away gardening tools, and tidy around the grill area. 

Now focus on the inside of the home where cleanliness, space, smell and lighting are vital. First get your house in tip-top condition by cleaning and clearing away clutter. Steam clean and vacuum the carpet. Make sure your floors are waxed and shiny. Touch up nicks on walls and make sure the porcelain sinks and tubs and metallic fixtures shine. 

Be conscious of any lingering odors such as smoke, pets or strong-smelling foods. You may need to air out your home prior to your open house event. Consider grinding fresh lemons in the garbage disposal. And don’t forget to empty all trash containers. 

Look at your countertops in the kitchen and bathrooms and the tops of your bureaus. Do they seem cluttered? Clear away and store as much as possible. You want your home to seem spacious. 

Next, set the mood. Let your prospective buyers picture your home as their own. Rearrange the furniture so that rooms look more spacious, or consider removing furniture and accessories. 

Lighting is also important to creating a desirable atmosphere. Bright lights provide a cheerful environment and make a small space appear larger. Pull back all the drapes and open the blinds. Turn on all the lights. Make sure all light sockets have fresh bulbs. Use softer lights for rooms in which you want a warm, cozy feeling.

Don’t forget little touches such as fresh flowers, lighted candles in the bathrooms, new logs in the fireplace, or a bowl of fresh fruit on the kitchen counter. You may even want to set your dining-room table with color-coordinated table settings.

When you list your home with the Schnoor Team, we provide you with an exhaustive list of ideas collected from decorators, stagers and The National Association of Realtors.  These are tried and true proven and effective ways to place your home at the TOP of the list for prospective buyers.  So give us a call we would love the opportunity to share with you!

Displaying blog entries 1-10 of 21

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