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Summer Events

by The Schnoor Team

August 31 – September 1

As summer cools down, the Village of Hatch heats up. Labor Day weekend heralds the annual Hatch Chile Festival, a two-day celebration of New Mexico’s most esteemed crop. Festivalgoers can sample famed chile recipes, watch the crowning of the Chile Festival queen, or toss a horseshoe in celebration of our most famous crop.  Hatch Chile Festival!

 

Please click: http://www.hatchchilefest.com/

Source: "Summer Events"

Spend your summer in New Mexico

by The Schnoor Team


There’s always a reason to celebrate in New Mexico.

Lavender, flamenco, river-rafting, Native dancers, 50-foot-tall puppets being lit on fire — these events show off the best of summer in the Land of Enchantment. (And, yes, there will even be pie.)
Lavender in the Village

July 20 - 21
The 13th annual Lavender Festival returns with live music, free yoga classes, a kids camp, wellness seminars, cooking demonstrations, and 70 artisans offering everything from lavender bouquets to lavender paintings, pies, spices, lotions, beer, and wine. A perfect day for lavender lovers of all ages.  Lavender in the Village

Time: 8:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. 
Where: Agri-Nature Center at Village of Los Ranchos, NM 

Source: "Spend your summer in New Mexico"

Chile Capital of the World

by The Schnoor Team

 

No adventure in New Mexico is complete until you have experienced our cuisine.


Unlike any other, it is a blend of flavors from Spanish and Native American cultures that has been perfected over the course of 400 years. At the center of it all is the New Mexican chile, in both red and green varieties, which is used in everything from enchiladas to ice cream. Whether you are looking for a dining experience that has received a James Beard award or an authentic dive off the beaten path, you will find it here.

Click the link below to find Culinary Treasures, Ale Trail, Wine Trail, Chocolate Trail, Green Chili Cheeseburger Trail and Breakfast Burrito Byway. 

Source: "Chile Capital of the World"

 

 

Grub Control & Other Curb Appeal

by The Schnoor Team

If your lawn could talk, it would tell you to water deeply and less often.

You'll spend less time (and money, if you hire help) if you do these things now rather than later.

#1 Buy Outdoor Power Tools

Trim 15% to 30% off the cost of powered edgers, saws, and more by taking advantage of Father's Day sales — which typically offer the lowest prices of the year.

#2 Start a Lawn Watering Schedule

When temps climb into the 80s, make sure your lawn's getting enough water to preserve your curb appeal. That means at least 1 inch of water a week for cool season grasses and a half-inch for warm-season varieties.

Lawns prefer to gulp rather than sip. So water deeply, up to 30 minutes, rather than frequently. You'll waste less water, too.

#3 Use Grub Control

Grubs dine on your lawn's roots. Left to gorge, they'll kill your lawn. That's not cheap to replace: up to $2 a square foot to re-sod. Go the preventive route, and spread a lawn grub-control product that will take care of the eggs now — before they hatch and start munching hungrily.

#4 Stick to a Mowing Schedule

Cutting your grass too long or too short, or neglecting to cut it regularly will slowly erode your property's good looks. To prevent that, you (or your lawn service) should cut no more than one-third of the grass blade per mow. Whacking off more leaves your yard susceptible to pests and disease.

Note: You may need to plan for up to two mows a week to stay ahead of growth.

Source: "Grub Control & Other Curb Appeal Tasks for June"

 

Summer Home Maintenance Tips — Specifically for June

by The Schnoor Team

Invest in quality tools while they’re on sale this month.

Temps start to soar in June when days start to get longer.

Stop your energy and water bills from soaring, too, with these summer home maintenance tips:

#1 Stop Buying Cheap Tools

Happy Father's Day to everyone: It's tool-sale month! Repairs and home improvement projects go much smoother with quality tools — and you'll like the results more. This month, take advantage of sales to buy quality brands for less, or buy used tools at a local auction or estate sale. Then ditch those make-do tools that have always frustrated you.

#2 Stop Heat-Drying Your Dishes

You're already paying extra to pump cool air into your house. Don't pay even more to use the heat-dry setting on your dishwasher. It can double your electrical load.

Instead, open the dishwasher immediately after it runs, and pull out the racks. The evaporating steam will speed-dry the dishes. Some dishwashers have an air-dry button that will automatically prevent heat drying.

#3 Stop Watering Your Lawn So Much

Lawns are a bit picky about their drinking schedule. Rather than daily soaks, they prefer deep, infrequent watering, which promotes deeper root growth. In general, lawns need about 1 inch of water per week. In a well-watered lawn, you can stick a screwdriver 6 to 8 inches into the dirt without resistance.

#4 Stop Putting Bricks in the Toilet

Summer may be water-conscientiousness season, but putting a brick in your toilet is the wrong means to that well-meaning end. Brick crumbles when exposed to water for too long. Instead, switch to a high-efficiency toilet. At $100-$300 per toilet, the $230 annual water savings is worth it. Or just swap your brick with a half-gallon milk jug filled with sand.

Source: "Summer Home Maintenance Tips — Specifically for June"


Sharp Homeowners Know June Is the Best Time to Do These 5 Things

by The Schnoor Team

Like cleaning your siding — just be sure to start from the bottom and go up.

Could it really be summer?!

Tackle these five summer maintenance tasks during June's longer days and better weather — and save yourself time and money this winter.

#1 Update Outdoor Lighting

In June, winter nights are probably the last thing on your mind. But early summer is the perfect time to plan for those "OMG it's only 4:30, and it's already dark " moments by adding or updating landscape lighting.

The most energy-efficient, easy-to-install option is solar lighting, but it won't perform as well on dark or snowy days. For light no matter the weather, install electric.

LED bulbs last up to five times longer and also use less energy than comparable bulbs.

#2 Clean Your House's Siding

With a bit of preventative maintenance, your home's siding will stay clean and trouble-free for up to 50 years. Fifty years! Clean it this month with a soft cloth or a long-handled, soft-bristled brush to guarantee that longevity.

Start at the bottom of the house and work up, rinsing completely before it dries. That's how you avoid streaks.

#3 Focus on Your Foundation

There's no better time for inspecting your foundation than warm, dry June. Eyeball it for crumbling mortar, cracks in the stucco, or persistently damp spots (especially under faucets). Then call a pro to fix any outstanding issues now, before it becomes an emergency later.

#4 Seal Your Driveway Asphalt

Your driveway takes a daily beating. Weather, sunlight, cars, bikes, and foot traffic – all of these deteriorate the asphalt. Help it last by sealing it. Tip: The temperature must be 50 degrees or higher for the sealer to stick, making June a good month for this easy, cost-effective job.

#5 Buy Tools

Thanks to Father's Day, June is the month everyone can get a deal on tools, tool bags, and that multitool you've had your eye on. If it's time to replace a bunch of tools, or you're starting from scratch, look for package deals that offer several at once. These can pack a savings wallop, offering 30% off or more over buying the tools individually.

Source: "Sharp Homeowners Know June Is the Best Time to Do These 5 Things"

 

8 Ways New Homeowners Accidentally Trash Their Yards

by The Schnoor Team

Avoid these rookie mistakes to keep everything beautiful.

You’ve done it. You own a house with a yard. The great outdoors. Amber waves of grain. OK, maybe not grain, and ideally you want it green, not amber.

But now that you have it, how do you keep from screwing it up? By avoiding a few common gaffes that landscaping experts say new homeowners make waaay too often.

“They end up buying the wrong fertilizer, they have no clue what weed killer is, they kill their entire lawn, they kill their bushes — and then they call me,” says Dean Granat, who runs D&D Landscape & Sprinkler Services Inc. in Buffalo Grove, Ill.

Here’s what the pros say newbie homeowners often do wrong with their lawns and yards:

#1 Not Following Product Instructions

Peter and Leah Lenz, two bright, educated people (data scientist and attorney) were thrilled when they bought their Westchester County, N.Y., home — only to have their lawn undone by a little bugger known as the Japanese beetle.

“When we looked at the house originally, we weren’t even looking at the yard because it was March, and it was covered with snow,” says Peter. “But when we moved in, we noticed the previous owners had patched holes where the beetles had already hit.”

Once Peter identified the problem, he launched “full-out chemical warfare.”

Sadly, he did not read — nor heed — the instructions for his “weapons,” and the beetles won the first round.

“There are different granulated chemicals you can put down in the spring and the fall, and I discovered there are different formulations for the different seasons,” Peter says. “One of the mistakes I made the first year was using the spring formulation in the fall, and it didn’t do a damn thing.”

Today the lawn is lush and green thanks to the proper use of anti-beetle products the second time around. “I smile when I see the backyard,” Peter says.

#2 Misusing Fertilizer

The No. 1 problem new homeowners have with fertilizer, says Eric Groft of the landscaping firm Oehme van Sweden, is overdoing it.

“Instead of putting in the correct amount of fertilizer, they put in more — and more is not more.”

Too much fertilizer adversely affects plant growth, can burn and even kill grass and plants. And, if it runs off into waterways, can cause toxic algae bloom.

To avoid those awful outcomes, prep and apply fertilizer with care. Use only the amount of recommended fertilizer — or less.

And don’t skip a single prep step. Most powdered or liquid fertilizers need to be mixed with water.

Timing is important, too. Different species of grass have different needs. Warm-season grasses (Bermuda and St. Augustine) need to be fed when temperatures are warm. Late spring is usually good. Cool-season grasses (Kentucky bluegrass and tall fescue) prefer feeding in cooler temps, such as late fall, but before frost sets in.

#3 Not Watering Grass Deep Enough

Brown and dry, dehydrated grass is ugly. it invites weeds to set up squatting rights. But it’s not just about the ugly.

“If you’re thinking about a future resale, a good lawn is what gets people in the front door,” says Valerie Blake, a REALTOR® in Washington, D.C. A sad lawn just turns them away.

But novice homeowners often think watering a little bit here and a little bit there will suffice. If the grass is wet, it’s watered, right?

Not quite. It’s really a matter of how moist the soil is underneath. Ideally, you want the soil to be moist 6 inches deep.

Here’s how to make sure your lawn gets enough water:

  • Use a shovel to check that the soil is moist 6 inches deep.
  • The first time you water, check every 15 minutes.
  • Keep track of how long it takes to get moist.
  • Water that same amount of time the next time.

How often should you turn on the sprinklers? Do your homework, and, if the Joneses do in fact have a beautiful lawn, note how often they water and follow suit. (We won’t tell.)

#4 Cutting Grass Too Short

If mowing isn’t your idea of weekend fun, you might be tempted to skip a round or two by cutting the grass extra short.

And while cutting the grass shorter may save you from mowing so often, it ends up starving the plant, as sunlight is collected via the leaves. Hello, brown lawn.

“Grass should never be cut lower than two and a half to three inches,” says Granat.

#5 Overusing Weed Killer

“People will buy weed killer thinking it’s for dandelions and clover and will spray it over their whole yard,” Granat says.

“I had a customer who sprayed his whole lawn with weed killer. It killed everything and cost $8,000 to resod the lawn.”

So, only use the weed killer on small, isolated areas, OK? Non-chemical solutions work, too, such as pulling weeds out by hand or dousing them with boiling water.

But prevention is best. Smother them with mulch (add newspapers for an extra layer of protection) before they can take root.

#6 Trimming Limbs and Branches the Wrong Way

Out-of-control bushes can block windows and give insects (and burglars!) a direct path into the house. The solution? Cut them back.

But know where to cut. “Don’t saw it off in the middle of the branch,” says Groft. And don’t cut it flush with the trunk either.

You want to leave the “branch collar” — usually a small bump where the trunk and branch come together.

That bump contains special cells to help a tree or shrub recover from its wounds. Leaving the branch too long or cutting it too short prevents the branch collar from doing its job, which means instead of losing a branch or two, you could lose the entire tree or bush.

#7 Putting Plants Too Close Together

Impatience is really the culprit here. You want a lush yard fast. So you buy more plants and plant them closer together.

That’s a costly mistake. First, you’re buying plants you don’t need. And second, those plants will lose their looks really soon — or even die.

By planting bushes, shrubs, trees, annuals, or perennials closely together, you’re not giving them room to grow. And you’re forcing them to compete with each other for sunshine and nutrients in the soil. You won’t be happy with those results.

Nurseries usually include recommendations on how far apart to plant, but to give you an idea, here are a couple of guidelines:

  • Trees usually need to be planted as far apart as their mature width.
  • Perennials should be 6 to 36 inches apart, depending on their mature size.

It’s also OK to remove existing plants you don’t like. “If you have 30-year-old evergreens crowding a walkway, don’t be afraid to be subtractive,” Groft encourages.

#8 Letting Your Pet Urinate Wherever

It’s so tempting to let Fido go where and whenever he feels like it. But after awhile, you’ll notice yellow grass. Then dead grass. And that bush you planted a couple of months ago? Yeah, it’s half dead, too. They’re being burned alive by your dog’s urine. Not good.

But there are things you can do, such as training Fido to go in one special area. You could even make it a spot without any grass to kill at all.

“I’m starting to install a lot of dog runs for people. They’re all fenced in and we use some kind of stone on the surface,” Granat says.

Source: "8 Ways New Homeowners Accidentally Trash Their Yards"


Fishing in New Mexico

by The Schnoor Team

One of the nicest things about fishing in New Mexico is the year-round season for most waters. Add the broad variety of species from panfish to trout, bass and catfish, northern pike and walleye, and you have one of the best places to fish in the nation. And don’t forget about the phenomenon of winter ice fishing in the so-called desert Southwest

Out-of-state anglers must purchase an annual fishing license, a one-day license or a five-day license. The fishing license year is April 1- March 31.

A few lakes and parts of some streams are designated “Special Trout Waters,” more commonly referred to as “Quality Waters.” On most of them, only artificial flies and lures with single, barbless hooks can be used. All have restrictions on bag and possession limits. Many Indian pueblos and reservations offer public fishing, mostly for rainbow trout, some with bass or catfish.

FISHING IN NEW MEXICO BY REGION

NORTHWEST

Navajo Nation – Whiskey Lake, north of Gallup at 8,000 feet, offers average catches of 14- to 18-inch rainbow trout and a decent opportunity for 20-24-inch and larger fish (closed Dec.-Apr.). Navajo fishing and boat permits are available at sporting goods stores in the Gallup and Farmington areas. Reliable advice on routing to Whiskey and all lakes on the Navajo Nation is strongly advised. Visit the Navajo Nation Department of Fish and Wildlife website, http://www.nndfw.org/ for more information.

Navajo Lake State Park - This 15,000-acre irrigation impoundment in the Four Corners area is home to rainbow trout, brown trout, kokanee salmon (landlocked Pacific sockeye salmon), largemouth/smallmouth bass, northern pike, channel catfish, crappie and bluegill.  For information on Navajo Lake and the San Juan River below the lake, visit www.emnrd.state.nm.us/spd/navajolakestatepark.html.

San Juan River - The San Juan River is a famous trout stream because the water portion directly below the dam is nearly always cold and clear because the dam slows the water and filters out the mud. This stretch is among the most hallowed trout fishing waters in North America. The rich waters spawn abundant flora, which in turn creates a fine environment for insect proliferation, which in turn supports one of the most prolific trout populations in any large river, both in terms of quantity and average fish size. It is illegal to fish with more than two flies on a single line when fishing the special trout water on the San Juan River.

NORTH CENTRAL

Cochiti Lake - A U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACOE) lake 50 miles north of Albuquerque and about 10 miles west of 1-25 has black bass, white bass, bluegill, crappie, walleye, catfish and northern pike. While Cochiti Lake is located within the boundaries of Cochiti Pueblo, permission to fish there is not required, as it is a USACOE facility. Visit www.corpslakes.usace.army.mil

Heron Lake - Less than 20 miles southwest of U.S. 64 near Tierra Amarilla, Heron is a no-wake, 6,000-acre lake that favors fishing and sailing.  Produces 14- to 20-inch kokanee, and 10-to 20-plus-pound lake trout. Many visitors use guides to provide proper equipment and advice. Visit www.emnrd.state.nm.us/SPD/

Jemez Mountains - Jemez streams and Fenton Lake are accessible via N.M. 44 northwest out of Bernalillo, then N.M. 4 north out of San Ysidro.  Jemez waters are heavily stocked with catchable rainbows. Some streams have good populations of brown trout. Visit www.emnrd.state.nm.us/SPD/

Jicarilla Apache Reservation - Probably the best lake in the state for large rainbow trout is Stone Lake - 18 miles south of U.S. 64 out of Dulce. Stone Lake is currently stocked with rainbow trout, largemouth bass and brown trout. Stone is most easily fished from small boats and float tubes, and is an extremely productive fishery with an unbelievable diversity and abundance of aquatic invertebrates. Tiger salamanders and Fat head minnows also contribute to trout diets in this lake and growth rates of 2 inches have been recorded at Stone Lake. However, prolonged drought conditions have seriously affected the Jicarilla fishing lakes, and decreased opportunities for fishermen. There are seven fishing lakes ranging in size from 35-500 acres, when full. Two of these lakes, Hayden Lake and La Jara Lake are currently dry. The other lakes including Stone Lake, Mundo Lake, Enbom Lake, Dulce Lake and Horse Lake have been impacted by drought conditions but are currently stocked for fishing. Bait fishing is allowed at Mundo and Enbom Lakes. At Stone Lake, however, only artificial flies and lures, with barbless hooks, are allowed. Mundo Lake offers rainbow trout, brown trout, largemouth bass, channel catfish, and bluegill. Stone Lake also has rainbow, brown and largemouth bass; Enbom Lake has rainbow trout; and Dulce Lake features channel catfish. Visit www.jicarillahunt.com/fishing

Private Waters on the Brazos River - The Brazos River east of Chama flows mostly on private land. Two long-established lodges with a variety of accommodations and prices offer access to the river’s fine rainbow and brown trout - Corkins Lodge to 2.5 miles of private access, and Brazos Lodge to public access.

Red River and Lower Red River - The Red River originates in the Wheeler Peak Wilderness Area above Red River, NM.  The Red is New Mexico’s largest tributary to the Rio Grande.  There are two distinct sections on the Red River, the Upper Red and the Lower Red. The Upper Red River flows along Highway 578 and continues through the town of Red River.  This section is heavily stocked with rainbows and has wild browns and includes a 3-mile section of designated Special Trout Water.  The Upper Red fishes best May through October. The Lower Red River is a 4-5 mile stretch from Questa, NM to the confluence with the Rio Grande.   This wild canyon section features pocket water, riffles, plunge pools and short deep runs.  Easier access is at the Red River Fish Hatchery parking lot, ideal for a half day.  The better fly fishing requires hiking down one of two trails in the Wild and Scenic Rivers Area of the Rio Grande, west of Questa, NM.  Wild brown trout and some rainbows averaging 10-14 inches inhabit the Lower Red plus a few 15-16 inchers.  In the winter nice cuttbows migrate into the Lower Red from the Rio Grande.  The main fly fishing season is September through mid April, with fall and spring being best.  The summer can be hit or miss with runoff and rain.

Rio Chama Below El Vado Lake - In and around El Vado Ranch, rainbow and brown trout inhabit the many holes, pools and ripples of the nearby lakes and streams. In fact, this part of the Rio Chama is spectacular and it is not uncommon to hook an 18-20 inch trout. Take N.M. 112 west of U.S. 64 near Tierra Amarilla and proceed to Cooper’s EI Vado Ranch right at the river; parking fee applies.

Rio Grande - Anglers along the Rio Grande will be challenged by native brown trout, German brown trout, rainbow trout, and northern pike. All anglers, 12 years or older, must have the following: a valid New Mexico fishing license, a Wildlife Habitat Improvement validation, and a Habitat Management and Access Validation (Only those younger than 18, 100% Disabled Resident Veterans and Resident Anglers 70 and older are exempt from purchasing this validation.) in their possession. Licenses are available at the Rio Grande Gorge Visitor Center. To improve trout fisheries, "Special Trout Waters" have been designated north from Taos Junction Bridge to Colorado. Anglers need to be aware of special restrictions that apply in this area. Visit www.blm.gov/nm

NORTHEAST

Cimarron River – The Cimarron River flows east out of Eagle Nest Lake, U.S. 64, through Cimarron Canyon State Park. Good for 10- to 14-inch rainbows and browns. A stretch of Special Trout Water starts near Tolby Campground.

Clayton Lake - A 176-acre impoundment, about 15 miles northwest of Clayton and north of U.S. 64, Clayton Lake State Park has one boat ramp. Fish for rainbows, walleye, largemouth, catfish and big bluegill.

Eagle Nest Lake State Park – Eagle Nest Lake, a 2,000-acre impoundment alongside U.S. 64 northeast of Taos, is one of the state’s premier kokanee and trout lakes, surrounded by the stunning scenery of the high mountains of the Moreno Valley. The lake at 8,300’ elevation is a cool retreat from summer heat or a winter wonderland. Good in open water or through the ice for 14-inch plus rainbows.

Springer Area Lakes - Springer Lake is about 5 miles west of Springer. Best (Apr.-June and Sept.-Oct.) for 5- to 25-pound northern pike. Lake 13 on the Maxwell National Wildlife Refuge, off N.M. 445 just outside the village of Maxwell, produces rainbows in the range of 12 to 24 inches.  Charette Lakes on a mesa southwest of Springer usually offer good fishing for 10- to 14-inch rainbows and perch. Maxwell and Charette Lakes closed Nov.-Feb.  Contact the Springer Chamber of Commerce, 575-483-2998 or springercofc@railnet-isp.com

Valle Vidal - The Valle Vidal is a lush mountain basin located in the heart of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, in northern New Mexico. It is managed by the Carson National Forest primarily for its wildlife, as well as its outstanding scenic and recreational opportunities. The Valle Vidal is a veritable Rocky Mountain paradise, with abundant populations of regional wildlife, including mule deer, black bear, mountain lion, bald eagles, and native Rio Grande cutthroat trout. Shuree Ponds, open July 1 to Dec. 31, are stocked with 15-inch-plus rainbow trout, with one reserved for anglers under 12. Daily bag is two 15-inch or bigger fish.

Three lakes along 1-40 between Tucumcari and Santa Rosa usually offer good fishing for walleye: Ute Lake, 25 miles northeast of Tucumcari along U.S. 54 near Logan; Conchas Lake, 31 miles from Tucumcari via N.M. 104; and Santa Rosa Lake, about 10 miles north of 1-40 out of Santa Rosa. The lakes also have small mouth/largemouth bass and channel catfish; great some years for crappie; and Ute and Conchas also have white bass. Be sure to check water levels before planning any fishing trip.

SOUTHEAST

Brantley Lake - An impoundment on the Pecos River reached via CR 30 off U.S. 285, 12 miles north of Carlsbad, Brantley Lake has largemouth/spotted/white bass, walleye, catfish, crappie and bluegill. If you go, concentrate on the upper portions of the lake for channel catfish and white bass. Brantley is catch and release fishing only due to contamination concerns.

Rio Peñasco on Private Land - The Peñasco is a spring creek with nine miles of trout water teeming with wild browns and rainbows along NM 82 east of Cloudcroft. A number of springs help maintain a water temperature of 52-60 degrees year round. Most of the wild browns and rainbows average 10-14 inches with realistic odds of trout reaching 20 inches. The constant water temperatures and tremendous aquatic insect population allow the trout to grow year round. The entire length of the Peñasco is privately owned. Mel and Jennifer Foley (505-687-2221) operate a 2-mile section known as The Rio Penasco Fishing Company. The Foleys offer day trips and overnight camping in comfortable tent-cabins with a full bathhouse. The Mesilla Valley Flyfishers have a two-mile public access lease on the Cleve Ranch. A $10 daily permit is available at the well-posted parking areas along US Highway 82 or by calling the Anglers Nook in Las Cruces, NM (505-522-3810). Five miles of the Penasco on the Mulcock Ranch (505-687-3352) is available for day fishing with a nominal rod fee. The Mulcock Ranch currently features a bunkhouse available for camping.

Ruidoso Area – The Ruidoso River: The Ruidoso River is still recovering from the flooding of 2008 and intermittent low water levels due to drought in recent years. Fishing may be fair for small brown trout and good for rainbows if water levels allow stocking. Grindstone Lake: Stocking of rainbows has been sporadic the last few years due to water quality problems. During the summer, try fishing early in the day (before the sun hits the water) and cast to rising fish. Check stocking reports and lake levels before planning a fishing trip. Bonito Lake remains closed for fishing until further notice.

SOUTHWEST

Bill Evans - Some 30 miles northwest of Silver City and about four miles southwest of U.S. 180, Bill Evans Lake is 300 feet above the river that fills it. Water from the Gila River is pumped up a high mesa to where a sparkling lake is impounded.  The lake annually fills anglers' creels with crappie, channel catfish, bluegill and largemouth bass. Trout, although present throughout the year, are more active from October through May. Compared to other southwestern lakes, Bill Evans has relatively cool waters and largemouth bass grow slower than in warmer lakes. Call New Mexico Department of Game and Fish, 575-522-9796.

Caballo Lake - About 16 miles south of Truth or Consequences via 1-25, Caballo Lake holds a large population of walleye in the 14-24 inch range and fishing should be very good. Fishing should be very good for blue and channel catfish ranging from 10-20 inches.

Elephant Butte Lake - New Mexico’s big one, Elephant Butte Lake is a few miles north of Truth or Consequences, just east of 1-25. Current lake conditions appear to favor blue catfish. Fishing for them should be excellent. White and largemouth bass fishing will be fair throughout the lake during late spring and summer. The Department plans to stock 1 million striped bass fry this spring. Several large stripers were found in recent surveys, but they are few and far between. Fishing should be good for walleye.

Silver City Area - Fishing Lake Roberts for largemouth bass and bluegill is generally good from spring to early summer. Channel catfish should be good in summer. During the winter, fishing for stocked rainbow trout should be good. Fishing at Quemado Lake should be good for stocked rainbow trout throughout the year, but slows in the summer as water temperatures increase. Tiger muskies are available throughout the year and are currently being caught at record sizes at Quemado, as well as at Bluewater Lake (you can only keep one, however, and it has to be longer than 40 inches). Fishing for stocked rainbow trout at Snow Lake is best from November- March. Expect fishing to be slowest in the summer. Both the Gila River and the San Francisco River along with their many tributaries are located within the Forest. Upper reaches and headwater tributaries of both rivers offer trout fishing, the lower reaches of both rivers offer quality warm water fishing opportunities. Visit the www.wildlife.state.nm.us fishing report.

CENTRAL

Sandia Pueblo lakes - Open all year. North of Albuquerque; take the Alameda exit west about a mile to N.M. 313, then north about a mile.  Three small lakes with bass, catfish and rainbow trout; Anglers can expect to catch 10- to 13-inch rainbows. Subject to availability, sometimes stocked with 3- to 8-pound rainbows.

Tingley Beach: The three ponds at Tingley Beach provide something for everyone. Whether you want to fish the Catch and Release pond, or want to expose a young angler to the sport at the Kid’s Pond, you’re set at Tingley Beach. Catchable-size trout and catfish are stocked from October through April in large quantities. If you live within Albuquerque or the surrounding communities, Tingley Beach is a classic “urban fishery” and it’s hard to beat.

Source: "Fishing in New Mexico"

9 Ways to Disaster-Proof Your Home Against Summer Storms

by The Schnoor Team

Turns out a tidy yard and clean gutters do way more than just look nice.

Sure, cleaning your gutters and trimming your trees may not seem like heroic tasks, but hey, when a thunderstorm is doing its worst outside, those mundane little jobs are your home’s armor.

So suit-up the whole place. These nine tips will get your home ready for summer disasters, like water damage to your home, power outages, and fires. (You’ll save yourself a pretty penny, too.)

#1 Clean Gutters to Prevent Water Damage

It’s a fairly simple task, but so easy to put off. Who wants to schlep out a ladder for an afternoon of gutter cleaning?

But clogged gutters mean storm water can overflow, saturating — and possibly penetrating — your home’s foundation. Gutter build-up can also contribute to water seeping into your attic and damaging walls.

While you’re scooping debris, check the downspouts for clogs by flushing them with water from a garden hose.

Or skip the hassle and hire a pro.

#2 Protect Your Roof from Storm Damage by Trimming Trees

You know what happens in severe storms. Tree limbs break away and fall. If huge tree limbs are dangling over your house, you’re at risk for major roof damage. Cut back limbs to reduce their weight.

Also, make sure they’re at least four feet above the roof. Tree limbs make great balance beams for critters to tumble into your attic; don’t make it easy on them.

#3 Install a French Drain to Keep Storm Water Away

A French drain — named after a guy named French, not the country — is a lightly sloped trench (1 inch per 8 feet) filled with round gravel and a pipe that diverts water away from your house.

The drain can be shallow or deep depending on whether you’ve got a soggy lawn or a bigger problem with water entering your basement during heavy storms.

#4 Prepare for a Power Outage with a Generator

An hour in the dark is an inconvenience, but a power outage of a day or two — especially when it’s 100 degrees outside — can be hazardous to your health (and pricey, as all your refrigerated and frozen foods spoil).

Invest in either a portable or standby generator, depending on how much you want to spend and how much power you need.

Generators vary by wattage output — the amount of power they can generate at one time. So check appliance needs: a four-slice toaster might use a whopping 1,650 watts – way more wattage than a portable AC unit (often under 500 watts).

#5 Prevent Fires with Hardscaping and a Tidy Yard

And you thought a well-maintained lawn and that flagstone patio were just for fab curb appeal (and to make the neighbors jealous). Au contraire. Stone doesn’t burn.

You can also deprive flames of fuel by keeping the grass short and irrigated, removing dry leaves and dead plants, and pruning dead branches. If you needed extra motivation to get off the patio and get that yard work done, there you go.

#6 Install Impact-Proof Doors and Windows

Think a door is just a door? When it’s rattling on its hinges mid-storm, you’ll change your mind.

Impact-resistant windows, doors, and garage doors can inhibit high winds that cause structural damage from entering your home.

Bonus: Impact-resistant features can also protect your home from intruders, reduce outside noise, and stop warm or cool air from escaping.

#7 Update Your Insurance

Sometimes you really do need to read the fine print.

Once a year, review your homeowners insurance to make sure you can rebuild your whole house in case of a disaster. See if you’re adequately covered for things like flood damage, too.

Plus, make updates based on recent home improvements, like that fancy burglar alarm you just installed, and ask about any new discounts for bundling with your car insurance.

#8 Check Fire Extinguishers

Scary stat alert: 660 people died in home fires in just the first two months of 2018.

While a fire extinguisher doesn’t technically expire, it’s possible for its seal to weaken over time, causing the pressure to drop and rendering it useless. Check that the locking pin is intact and the pressure gauge or indicator is pointing to “full.” (Sometimes this is a green bar.)

And did you know you’re supposed to keep a fire extinguisher on each floor? Or that different rooms require a different type of extinguisher? If not, a fire-safety shopping spree might be in order.

#9 Pick Wildfire-Wise Plants

Speaking of fires, homeowners too often don’t consider how their plant choices help or hinder them.

Plants with stems that contain wax, terpenes, or oils are super flammable — as are junipers, hollies, eucalyptus, and pines.

Particularly if you live in a wildfire-prone area, choose fire-resistant foundation plantings like azalea, boxwood, hydrangeas, and burning bushes. (Ironic, right?)

Succulents, like sedum, have high water content and are less flammable. If you use bark mulch, which is highly flammable, keep it moist. Less flammable mulches are gravel, decorative rock, or bark-and-rock combinations. You can find a whole bunch of plants appropriate for your area at Firewise.org.

Source: "9 Ways to Disaster-Proof Your Home Against Summer Storms"

New Mexico River Adventures

by The Schnoor Team

Whitewater Rafting, Kayaking, Stand Up Paddle boarding...Do it all! New Mexico River Adventures specializes in the highest quality outdoor adventures available in New Mexico including whitewater river rafting, kayaking, and Stand Up Paddle boarding Come experience the best professional guiding, service and instruction on the Rio Grande and Rio Chama. Adventure, fun, and fantastic food, too! New Mexico River Adventures' Guides are fun, informative and well equipped with an immense amount of experience on the rivers of Northern New Mexico and around the world. Enjoy a trip with these experienced, fun guides who really know each river's history, geography, and unique plant and animal life, as well as being great cooks! Visit our Brand New River Headquarters! At New Mexico River Adventures we believe that your trip starts the minute you arrive at our headquarters. Upon arriving, our guests will appreciate the welcoming atmosphere as well as the private and secure parking. Don't worry if you forgot any items for your trip as our outfitters store provides easy access to any items you might need. After checking in and meeting your guides, you will enjoy our private changing rooms and restrooms before it's off to the river. After the trip, our headquarters is the perfect atmosphere to relax and chat with the guides and other guests as you view the whitewater photos from your trip. You can choose from single-day excursions, multi-day adventures, or customize your own trip!


Source: "New Mexico River Adventures"


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